Product Portfolio

Vericel markets three autologous cell therapy products in the U.S.

What is Maci?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Maci (autologous cultured chondrocytes on porcine collagen membrane) for the repair of symptomatic, full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee in adult patients. Maci is the first FDA-approved product that applies the process of tissue engineering to grow cells on scaffolds using healthy cartilage tissue from the patient’s own knee.
Knee problems are common, and occur in people of all ages. Cartilage defects in the knee can result from an injury, straining the knee beyond its normal motion, or can be caused by overuse, muscle weakness, and general wear and tear.

What is Carticel?

Carticel is used to repair articular cartilage injuries in the knee (femoral condyle) in patients who have had an inadequate response to a prior arthroscopic or other surgical repair procedure. Carticel is an FDA-approved biologic product that consists of a patient’s own harvested cartilage cells (chondrocytes) which are then multiplied into millions of cells. These autologous cultured chondrocytes are then implanted into the knee cartilage defect in a surgical procedure called autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). When implanted, Carticel generates hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue.

Indication

Carticel® (autologous cultured chondrocytes) is an autologous cellular product indicated for the repair of symptomatic cartilage defects of the femoral condyle (medial, lateral or trochlea), caused by acute or repetitive trauma, in patients who have had an inadequate response to a prior arthroscopic or other surgical repair procedure (e.g., debridement, microfracture, drilling/abrasion arthroplasty, or osteochondral allograft/autograft).

Carticel should only be used in conjunction with debridement, placement of a periosteal flap and rehabilitation. The independent contributions of the autologous cultured chondrocytes and other components of the therapy to outcome are unknown.

Carticel is not indicated for the treatment of cartilage damage associated with generalized osteoarthritis.

Carticel is not recommended for patients with total meniscectomy unless surgically reconstructed prior to or concurrent with Carticel implantation.

Important Safety Information

Carticel should not be used in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to gentamicin, other aminoglycosides or materials of bovine origin.

It should not be used in patients who have previously had cancer in the bones, cartilage, fat or muscle of the treated limb.

Pre-existing conditions, including meniscal tears, joint instability, or malalignment should be assessed and treated prior to or concurrent with Carticel implantation.

Carticel is not routinely tested for transmissible infectious diseases and may transmit disease to the healthcare provider handling Carticel.

Use of Carticel in children, patients over age 65, or in joints other than the knee has not yet been assessed.

The occurrence of subsequent surgical procedures (SSPs), primarily arthroscopy, following Carticel implantation is common. In the Study of the Treatment of Articular Repair (STAR), forty-nine percent (49%) of patients underwent an SSP on the treated knee, irrespective of their relationship to Carticel, during the 4-year follow up. The most common serious adverse events (≥5% of patients), derived from STAR, include arthrofibrosis/joint adhesions, graft overgrowth, chondromalacia or chondrosis, cartilage injury, graft complication, meniscal lesion, graft delamination, and osteoarthritis.

Hope with Epicel Epicel is indicated for use in adults and pediatric patients who have deep dermal or full thickness burns comprising a total body surface area greater than or equal to 30%. It may be used in conjunction with split-thickness autografts, or alone in patients for whom split-thickness autografts may not be an option due to the severity and extent of their burns.

What is Epicel? Epicel is a cultured epidermal autograft (CEA) — a skin graft grown from a patient’s own skin. These grafts provide skin replacement for patients who have deep dermal or full thickness burns comprising a total body surface area of greater than or equal to 30%. From 2 postage stamp-sized biopsies, Vericel can grow enough skin to cover the patient’s entire body.

Indication
Epicel® (cultured epidermal autografts) is indicated for use in adults and pediatric patients who have deep dermal or full thickness burns comprising a total body surface area greater than or equal to 30%.  It may be used in conjunction with split-thickness autografts, or alone in patients for whom split-thickness autografts may not be an option due to the severity and extent of their burns.
Important Safety Information
Epicel (cultured epidermal autografts) is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to vancomycin, amikacin, or amphotericin. Epicel should not be used in patients with sensitivities to materials of bovine or murine origin. Epicel is contraindicated for use on clinically infected wounds. Because Epicel is manufactured with and contains residual amounts of murine cells, the FDA considers it a xenotransplantation product. Therefore, recipients should not donate whole blood, blood components, source plasma, source leukocytes, tissue, breast milk, ova, sperm or other body parts for use in humans because there is a potential risk of carrying an infection that is transmitted from mouse cells to humans. In addition, the risk of disease transmission from Epicel is unknown. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been reported in patients with burn injury after being grafted with Epicel. The most common adverse reactions, occurring in > 2% of patients were infection, graft shear, blister, drainage, sepsis, graft detachment and renal failure. Patient information supplied by treating physicians and attending burn teams from 1989 to 1996 included 552 patients, 205 children (age 21 years and younger) and 347 adults reported death (13%) and the adverse reactions of highest incidence as: infection (13.8%), graft shear (7.8%), blister (4.2%) and drainage (3.3%). From June 1998 through September, 2015, over 1,662 patients, including 589 children (age 21 and younger) and 1,073 adults were tracked through spontaneous reports via medical device reports, reports from burn sites and published literature. Adverse reactions were similar to the previously identified adverse reactions. Events that were reported in ≥ 2% of patients included death (8.8%), and adverse reactions of multi-organ failure, sepsis, infection and graft procedure complications. Because of the potential underreporting of adverse reactions from these sources, the percentages of adverse reactions should be interpreted with caution. Epicel is intended solely for autologous use. The effectiveness of Epicel has not been proven in clinical studies. The long-term safety of Epicel is unknown. The safety of Epicel has not been studied in pregnant and nursing women.